Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics for Business Lawyers

$75.00

Lawyers advising businesses on transactions or negotiating on their behalf often confront a range of important ethical questions.  The biggest is, who is your client?  Often a company’s owners or managers will not understand the distinction between representing them and representing the company? There are also issues of identifying and clearing conflicts among clients when they are negotiating transaction.  And what can a lawyer say or do when negotiating for a client? Also, lawyers are sometimes confronted with issues about what to do when clients are dishonest.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to ethical issues when representing clients in business transactions.  Ethical issues in business and corporate practice Identifying your client in a variety of transactional contexts – the company v. its managers? Conflicts of interest in representing both sides of a transaction Ethical issues in transactional negotiations and communications with represented parties Representing clients you know to be dishonest and reporting wrong-doing “up and out”   Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com<http://www.freivogelonconflicts.com/> .Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/5/2021
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics for Business Lawyers

$75.00

Lawyers advising businesses on transactions or negotiating on their behalf often confront a range of important ethical questions.  The biggest is, who is your client?  Often a company’s owners or managers will not understand the distinction between representing them and representing the company? There are also issues of identifying and clearing conflicts among clients when they are negotiating transaction.  And what can a lawyer say or do when negotiating for a client? Also, lawyers are sometimes confronted with issues about what to do when clients are dishonest.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to ethical issues when representing clients in business transactions.  Ethical issues in business and corporate practice Identifying your client in a variety of transactional contexts – the company v. its managers? Conflicts of interest in representing both sides of a transaction Ethical issues in transactional negotiations and communications with represented parties Representing clients you know to be dishonest and reporting wrong-doing “up and out”   Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com<http://www.freivogelonconflicts.com/> .Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/5/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: The Ins-and-Out of Licensing Technology, Part 1

$75.00

Licenses are complex agreements governing the use of software, technology and other inventions.  Most companies depend on technology it licenses to create operate and create value.  But these complex instruments are also traps for the unwary, blending how and when the licensed technology can be used, in what territory, and by whom.  Licenses also incorporate sprawling indemnity and damages provisions. Carefully drafted, negotiated or reviewed, licenses can be the fount of great value. But their complexity is also fraught with traps.  This program will provide you with an intermediate-level guide to drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of licenses, including scope of use, property ownership and adaptation, royalties, warranties and indemnity, and remedies.   Day 1: Drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of client licenses Defining the scope of the license – usage, territory, time and updates Royalties – different structures and audits Warranties in licensing – implied and express Protecting the exchange of confidential information – employee issues and trade secrets   Day 2: Remedies on breach – financial liability and specific performance Indemnity – scope of obligation, exclusions, mechanics, remedies/triggers Limitation of liability – forms liability and failure of essential purpose Risk management – insurance, escrow, force majeure IP diligence – what to look for and red flags   Speaker: Matt McKinney is a partner in the Denver office of Koenig, Oelsner, Taylor, Schoenfeld & Gaddis P.C., where his practice focuses on structuring and negotiating complex commercial and technology transactions and representing companies in intellectual property and technology-related matters.  He is experienced with a wide range of contracts regarding the commercialization and protection of intellectual property including software, content, patent and trademark licenses, and software as a service (SaaS) agreements.  Mr. McKinney earned his B.A. from Grinnell College and his J.D., with distinction, from the University of Iowa College of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/18/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: The Ins-and-Out of Licensing Technology, Part 1

$75.00

Licenses are complex agreements governing the use of software, technology and other inventions.  Most companies depend on technology it licenses to create operate and create value.  But these complex instruments are also traps for the unwary, blending how and when the licensed technology can be used, in what territory, and by whom.  Licenses also incorporate sprawling indemnity and damages provisions. Carefully drafted, negotiated or reviewed, licenses can be the fount of great value. But their complexity is also fraught with traps.  This program will provide you with an intermediate-level guide to drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of licenses, including scope of use, property ownership and adaptation, royalties, warranties and indemnity, and remedies.   Day 1: Drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of client licenses Defining the scope of the license – usage, territory, time and updates Royalties – different structures and audits Warranties in licensing – implied and express Protecting the exchange of confidential information – employee issues and trade secrets   Day 2: Remedies on breach – financial liability and specific performance Indemnity – scope of obligation, exclusions, mechanics, remedies/triggers Limitation of liability – forms liability and failure of essential purpose Risk management – insurance, escrow, force majeure IP diligence – what to look for and red flags   Speaker: Matt McKinney is a partner in the Denver office of Koenig, Oelsner, Taylor, Schoenfeld & Gaddis P.C., where his practice focuses on structuring and negotiating complex commercial and technology transactions and representing companies in intellectual property and technology-related matters.  He is experienced with a wide range of contracts regarding the commercialization and protection of intellectual property including software, content, patent and trademark licenses, and software as a service (SaaS) agreements.  Mr. McKinney earned his B.A. from Grinnell College and his J.D., with distinction, from the University of Iowa College of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/18/2021
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: The Ins-and-Out of Licensing Technology, Part 2

$75.00

Licenses are complex agreements governing the use of software, technology and other inventions.  Most companies depend on technology it licenses to create operate and create value.  But these complex instruments are also traps for the unwary, blending how and when the licensed technology can be used, in what territory, and by whom.  Licenses also incorporate sprawling indemnity and damages provisions. Carefully drafted, negotiated or reviewed, licenses can be the fount of great value. But their complexity is also fraught with traps.  This program will provide you with an intermediate-level guide to drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of licenses, including scope of use, property ownership and adaptation, royalties, warranties and indemnity, and remedies.   Day 1: Drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of client licenses Defining the scope of the license – usage, territory, time and updates Royalties – different structures and audits Warranties in licensing – implied and express Protecting the exchange of confidential information – employee issues and trade secrets   Day 2: Remedies on breach – financial liability and specific performance Indemnity – scope of obligation, exclusions, mechanics, remedies/triggers Limitation of liability – forms liability and failure of essential purpose Risk management – insurance, escrow, force majeure IP diligence – what to look for and red flags   Speaker: Matt McKinney is a partner in the Denver office of Koenig, Oelsner, Taylor, Schoenfeld & Gaddis P.C., where his practice focuses on structuring and negotiating complex commercial and technology transactions and representing companies in intellectual property and technology-related matters.  He is experienced with a wide range of contracts regarding the commercialization and protection of intellectual property including software, content, patent and trademark licenses, and software as a service (SaaS) agreements.  Mr. McKinney earned his B.A. from Grinnell College and his J.D., with distinction, from the University of Iowa College of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/19/2021
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: The Ins-and-Out of Licensing Technology, Part 2

$75.00

Licenses are complex agreements governing the use of software, technology and other inventions.  Most companies depend on technology it licenses to create operate and create value.  But these complex instruments are also traps for the unwary, blending how and when the licensed technology can be used, in what territory, and by whom.  Licenses also incorporate sprawling indemnity and damages provisions. Carefully drafted, negotiated or reviewed, licenses can be the fount of great value. But their complexity is also fraught with traps.  This program will provide you with an intermediate-level guide to drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of licenses, including scope of use, property ownership and adaptation, royalties, warranties and indemnity, and remedies.   Day 1: Drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of client licenses Defining the scope of the license – usage, territory, time and updates Royalties – different structures and audits Warranties in licensing – implied and express Protecting the exchange of confidential information – employee issues and trade secrets   Day 2: Remedies on breach – financial liability and specific performance Indemnity – scope of obligation, exclusions, mechanics, remedies/triggers Limitation of liability – forms liability and failure of essential purpose Risk management – insurance, escrow, force majeure IP diligence – what to look for and red flags   Speaker: Matt McKinney is a partner in the Denver office of Koenig, Oelsner, Taylor, Schoenfeld & Gaddis P.C., where his practice focuses on structuring and negotiating complex commercial and technology transactions and representing companies in intellectual property and technology-related matters.  He is experienced with a wide range of contracts regarding the commercialization and protection of intellectual property including software, content, patent and trademark licenses, and software as a service (SaaS) agreements.  Mr. McKinney earned his B.A. from Grinnell College and his J.D., with distinction, from the University of Iowa College of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/19/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Exit Strategies: Selling Companies to Employees, Part 1

$75.00

  Many closely held companies have only two potential sets of buyers – family members of the founding generation or managers and other employees of the enterprise. The market of third-party buyers for closely held companies can be very thin, so that when family members are not suitable buyers of a company, often the best solution is to sell to employees. But sales to employees are unlike sales to third-parties or family members, involving complex issues of how to finance the sale, transition management and control of the enterprise, retain key employees, and tax treatment. This program will provide you with a detailed discussion of the major issues of selling to employees, including valuation, how the sale price is financed, transition periods, retaining employees not in the buyout group, and tax treatment.   Day 1 : Long-range planning of sales to employees – and benefits over selling to third parties or family members Negotiating with employees over sales price and valuation issues Transitions of management control, including retaining seller/founder for a period of time Practical governance issues when employees are identified as potential buyers   Day 2 : Overview of alternative structures and the tradeoffs of each ESOPs – structural, practical and tax issues, including leveraged buyout options Use of company redemptions of founders to accomplish a transfer Crucial issues in drafting “earnouts” on sales to employees Seller financing options, including long-term notes and security interest in assets   Speaker: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/25/2021
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Exit Strategies: Selling Companies to Employees, Part 1

$75.00

  Many closely held companies have only two potential sets of buyers – family members of the founding generation or managers and other employees of the enterprise. The market of third-party buyers for closely held companies can be very thin, so that when family members are not suitable buyers of a company, often the best solution is to sell to employees. But sales to employees are unlike sales to third-parties or family members, involving complex issues of how to finance the sale, transition management and control of the enterprise, retain key employees, and tax treatment. This program will provide you with a detailed discussion of the major issues of selling to employees, including valuation, how the sale price is financed, transition periods, retaining employees not in the buyout group, and tax treatment.   Day 1 : Long-range planning of sales to employees – and benefits over selling to third parties or family members Negotiating with employees over sales price and valuation issues Transitions of management control, including retaining seller/founder for a period of time Practical governance issues when employees are identified as potential buyers   Day 2 : Overview of alternative structures and the tradeoffs of each ESOPs – structural, practical and tax issues, including leveraged buyout options Use of company redemptions of founders to accomplish a transfer Crucial issues in drafting “earnouts” on sales to employees Seller financing options, including long-term notes and security interest in assets   Speaker: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.    

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/25/2021
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Exit Strategies: Selling Companies to Employees, Part 2

$75.00

Many closely held companies have only two potential sets of buyers – family members of the founding generation or managers and other employees of the enterprise. The market of third-party buyers for closely held companies can be very thin, so that when family members are not suitable buyers of a company, often the best solution is to sell to employees. But sales to employees are unlike sales to third-parties or family members, involving complex issues of how to finance the sale, transition management and control of the enterprise, retain key employees, and tax treatment. This program will provide you with a detailed discussion of the major issues of selling to employees, including valuation, how the sale price is financed, transition periods, retaining employees not in the buyout group, and tax treatment.   Day 1: Long-range planning of sales to employees – and benefits over selling to third parties or family members Negotiating with employees over sales price and valuation issues Transitions of management control, including retaining seller/founder for a period of time Practical governance issues when employees are identified as potential buyers   Day 2: Overview of alternative structures and the tradeoffs of each ESOPs – structural, practical and tax issues, including leveraged buyout options Use of company redemptions of founders to accomplish a transfer Crucial issues in drafting “earnouts” on sales to employees Seller financing options, including long-term notes and security interest in assets   Speaker: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/26/2021
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Exit Strategies: Selling Companies to Employees, Part 2

$75.00

Many closely held companies have only two potential sets of buyers – family members of the founding generation or managers and other employees of the enterprise. The market of third-party buyers for closely held companies can be very thin, so that when family members are not suitable buyers of a company, often the best solution is to sell to employees. But sales to employees are unlike sales to third-parties or family members, involving complex issues of how to finance the sale, transition management and control of the enterprise, retain key employees, and tax treatment. This program will provide you with a detailed discussion of the major issues of selling to employees, including valuation, how the sale price is financed, transition periods, retaining employees not in the buyout group, and tax treatment.   Day 1: Long-range planning of sales to employees – and benefits over selling to third parties or family members Negotiating with employees over sales price and valuation issues Transitions of management control, including retaining seller/founder for a period of time Practical governance issues when employees are identified as potential buyers   Day 2: Overview of alternative structures and the tradeoffs of each ESOPs – structural, practical and tax issues, including leveraged buyout options Use of company redemptions of founders to accomplish a transfer Crucial issues in drafting “earnouts” on sales to employees Seller financing options, including long-term notes and security interest in assets   Speaker: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/26/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: "Boilplate" Provisions in Contracts: Overlooked Traps in Every Agreement

$75.00

The “back of the book” provisions of common business, commercial and real estate agreements are often labeled “boilerplate,” copied and pasted from earlier agreements. But when disputes arise, these overlooked provisions – related to damages, choice of law and forum, notice, integration, and amendments – can determine the fate transaction. These provisions, if not closely examined in the context of every agreement, can provide grounds for litigation – or threats of litigation. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting essential “boilerplate” provisions with an emphasis on reducing risk. Damages – types, limitations, drafting traps Choice of law/choice of forum – what the law allows v. what parties prefer Amendments – forms of written amendments, email, and course of dealing Notice – adapting methods to digital communication, traps Integration – conversations, extraneous writings, and assumptions Speaker: Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly Law Partners, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/9/2021
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: "Boilplate" Provisions in Contracts: Overlooked Traps in Every Agreement

$75.00

The “back of the book” provisions of common business, commercial and real estate agreements are often labeled “boilerplate,” copied and pasted from earlier agreements. But when disputes arise, these overlooked provisions – related to damages, choice of law and forum, notice, integration, and amendments – can determine the fate transaction. These provisions, if not closely examined in the context of every agreement, can provide grounds for litigation – or threats of litigation. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting essential “boilerplate” provisions with an emphasis on reducing risk. Damages – types, limitations, drafting traps Choice of law/choice of forum – what the law allows v. what parties prefer Amendments – forms of written amendments, email, and course of dealing Notice – adapting methods to digital communication, traps Integration – conversations, extraneous writings, and assumptions Speaker: Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly Law Partners, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/9/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Planning with S Corps, Part 1

$75.00

Despite the prevalence of LLCs, S Corps remain a preferred choice of entity for many family-controlled and other closely-held businesses.  They retain certain tax advantages over other pass-through entities and their corporate structure makes them familiar to investors, their legal counselors, and lenders. Still, S Corps are “fragile” entities in the sense that the tradeoff for their tax and other benefits is that they must adhere to a several capital structure restrictions, which limit their flexibility.  Drafting S Corp stockholders’ agreements is a careful balance of maximizing tax benefits, preventing the loss of the preferred tax status through inadvertently disqualifying corporate actions, and maximizing organizational flexibility in other areas. This program will provide you with a real world guide to business planning with S Corps and drafting their underlying stockholder agreements. Day 1: Business planning with S Corps and drafting S stockholders’ agreements Counseling clients on choice of entity considerations of S Corps v. LLCs/partnerships Capital structure issues – restrictions on types of debt and equity Who qualifies as an eligible  S Corp stockholder Transferability of interests and restrictions to preserve S Corp status   Day 2: Understanding tax benefits (and traps) of S Corps Distribution planning in S Corps – tax advantages/disadvantages of withdrawing money as salary or distributions Incentive compensation issues, including fringe benefits and restrictions on deductibility Planning for the merger or sale of an S Corp into another S Corp, LLC or C Corp   Speakers: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. James DePaoli is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where his practice focuses on corporate and commercial matters. He represents clients in the acquisition and disposition of assets and securities, mergers, and other business combinations and reorganizations. Mr. Paoli earned his B.S/B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and his J.D. from Duke University School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/15/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Planning with S Corps, Part 1

$75.00

Despite the prevalence of LLCs, S Corps remain a preferred choice of entity for many family-controlled and other closely-held businesses.  They retain certain tax advantages over other pass-through entities and their corporate structure makes them familiar to investors, their legal counselors, and lenders. Still, S Corps are “fragile” entities in the sense that the tradeoff for their tax and other benefits is that they must adhere to a several capital structure restrictions, which limit their flexibility.  Drafting S Corp stockholders’ agreements is a careful balance of maximizing tax benefits, preventing the loss of the preferred tax status through inadvertently disqualifying corporate actions, and maximizing organizational flexibility in other areas. This program will provide you with a real world guide to business planning with S Corps and drafting their underlying stockholder agreements. Day 1: Business planning with S Corps and drafting S stockholders’ agreements Counseling clients on choice of entity considerations of S Corps v. LLCs/partnerships Capital structure issues – restrictions on types of debt and equity Who qualifies as an eligible  S Corp stockholder Transferability of interests and restrictions to preserve S Corp status   Day 2: Understanding tax benefits (and traps) of S Corps Distribution planning in S Corps – tax advantages/disadvantages of withdrawing money as salary or distributions Incentive compensation issues, including fringe benefits and restrictions on deductibility Planning for the merger or sale of an S Corp into another S Corp, LLC or C Corp   Speakers: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. James DePaoli is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where his practice focuses on corporate and commercial matters. He represents clients in the acquisition and disposition of assets and securities, mergers, and other business combinations and reorganizations. Mr. Paoli earned his B.S/B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and his J.D. from Duke University School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/15/2021
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Planning with S Corps, Part 2

$75.00

Despite the prevalence of LLCs, S Corps remain a preferred choice of entity for many family-controlled and other closely-held businesses.  They retain certain tax advantages over other pass-through entities and their corporate structure makes them familiar to investors, their legal counselors, and lenders. Still, S Corps are “fragile” entities in the sense that the tradeoff for their tax and other benefits is that they must adhere to a several capital structure restrictions, which limit their flexibility.  Drafting S Corp stockholders’ agreements is a careful balance of maximizing tax benefits, preventing the loss of the preferred tax status through inadvertently disqualifying corporate actions, and maximizing organizational flexibility in other areas. This program will provide you with a real world guide to business planning with S Corps and drafting their underlying stockholder agreements. Day 1: Business planning with S Corps and drafting S stockholders’ agreements Counseling clients on choice of entity considerations of S Corps v. LLCs/partnerships Capital structure issues – restrictions on types of debt and equity Who qualifies as an eligible  S Corp stockholder Transferability of interests and restrictions to preserve S Corp status   Day 2: Understanding tax benefits (and traps) of S Corps Distribution planning in S Corps – tax advantages/disadvantages of withdrawing money as salary or distributions Incentive compensation issues, including fringe benefits and restrictions on deductibility Planning for the merger or sale of an S Corp into another S Corp, LLC or C Corp   Speakers: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. James DePaoli is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where his practice focuses on corporate and commercial matters. He represents clients in the acquisition and disposition of assets and securities, mergers, and other business combinations and reorganizations. Mr. Paoli earned his B.S/B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and his J.D. from Duke University School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/16/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Planning with S Corps, Part 2

$75.00

Despite the prevalence of LLCs, S Corps remain a preferred choice of entity for many family-controlled and other closely-held businesses.  They retain certain tax advantages over other pass-through entities and their corporate structure makes them familiar to investors, their legal counselors, and lenders. Still, S Corps are “fragile” entities in the sense that the tradeoff for their tax and other benefits is that they must adhere to a several capital structure restrictions, which limit their flexibility.  Drafting S Corp stockholders’ agreements is a careful balance of maximizing tax benefits, preventing the loss of the preferred tax status through inadvertently disqualifying corporate actions, and maximizing organizational flexibility in other areas. This program will provide you with a real world guide to business planning with S Corps and drafting their underlying stockholder agreements. Day 1: Business planning with S Corps and drafting S stockholders’ agreements Counseling clients on choice of entity considerations of S Corps v. LLCs/partnerships Capital structure issues – restrictions on types of debt and equity Who qualifies as an eligible  S Corp stockholder Transferability of interests and restrictions to preserve S Corp status   Day 2: Understanding tax benefits (and traps) of S Corps Distribution planning in S Corps – tax advantages/disadvantages of withdrawing money as salary or distributions Incentive compensation issues, including fringe benefits and restrictions on deductibility Planning for the merger or sale of an S Corp into another S Corp, LLC or C Corp   Speakers: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. James DePaoli is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where his practice focuses on corporate and commercial matters. He represents clients in the acquisition and disposition of assets and securities, mergers, and other business combinations and reorganizations. Mr. Paoli earned his B.S/B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and his J.D. from Duke University School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/16/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Drafting Supply Agreements

$75.00

Supply contracts are the backbone of many businesses, providing the buying with essential goods for a production process or finished product inventory for sale.  In the supply chains these agreements create, time is of the essence.  Buyers rely on timely delivery of quality raw material or inventory.  Production and sales are often finely calibrated for just in time delivery.  In addition, there area wide range of liability issues involved in these agreements because any disruption of the supply chain can cause substantial losses.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to reviewing the most important provisions of supply agreements for clients.  Drafting and negotiating most essential terms of supply agreements Issues for both suppliers and buyers in different industries Framework of law governing supply issue, including UCC warranty and title issues Product quality, volume commitments, delivery, and more Identifying, allocating, and mitigating risk – indemnity and insurance Spotting red flags in “form” supply agreements   Speaker: Joel R. Buckberg is a shareholder in the Nashville office of Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, P.C. and chair of the firm’s commercial transactions and business consulting group. He has more than 45 years’ experience structuring and drafting commercial, corporate and business transactions.  He also counsels clients on strategic planning, financing, mergers and acquisitions, system policy and practice development, regulatory compliance and contract system drafting. Prior to joining Baker Donelson, he was executive vice president and deputy general counsel of Cendant Corporation.  Mr. Buckberg received his B.S. form Union College, his M.B.A. from Vanderbilt University, and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/23/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Drafting Supply Agreements

$75.00

Supply contracts are the backbone of many businesses, providing the buying with essential goods for a production process or finished product inventory for sale.  In the supply chains these agreements create, time is of the essence.  Buyers rely on timely delivery of quality raw material or inventory.  Production and sales are often finely calibrated for just in time delivery.  In addition, there area wide range of liability issues involved in these agreements because any disruption of the supply chain can cause substantial losses.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to reviewing the most important provisions of supply agreements for clients.  Drafting and negotiating most essential terms of supply agreements Issues for both suppliers and buyers in different industries Framework of law governing supply issue, including UCC warranty and title issues Product quality, volume commitments, delivery, and more Identifying, allocating, and mitigating risk – indemnity and insurance Spotting red flags in “form” supply agreements   Speaker: Joel R. Buckberg is a shareholder in the Nashville office of Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, P.C. and chair of the firm’s commercial transactions and business consulting group. He has more than 45 years’ experience structuring and drafting commercial, corporate and business transactions.  He also counsels clients on strategic planning, financing, mergers and acquisitions, system policy and practice development, regulatory compliance and contract system drafting. Prior to joining Baker Donelson, he was executive vice president and deputy general counsel of Cendant Corporation.  Mr. Buckberg received his B.S. form Union College, his M.B.A. from Vanderbilt University, and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/23/2021
    Presented
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Due Diligence in Business Transactions

$75.00

Due diligence, often guided by lawyers, is essential to the success of major business transactions and poorly planned or conducted diligence can contribute to a buyer not getting the benefit of its bargain.  Diligence helps confirm essential assumptions about the value of a transaction and aids the discovery of unknown liabilities. There’s also a subtle relationship between the content of diligence and the time allowed to conduct it.  In more robust market environments, sellers have the upper hand and can limit diligence, making the process about time allocation and risk management. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning the diligence process, understanding the most important areas of inquiry depending on the type of transaction, and review checklists.   What to diligence, utilizing experts, and managing the process and time Impact of market environment on the length and scope of diligence Checklists – what information do you need to get, from whom, and on what timeline? Hard assets v. soft assets – how to diligence the validity and title to each Contracts with suppliers and customers – ensuring stability and visibility of revenue Financial records and statements – what should attorneys look for?   Speaker: C. Ben Huber is a partner in the Denver office of Greenburg Traurig, LLP, where he has a broad transactional practice encompassing mergers and acquisitions, restructurings and reorganizations, corporate finance, capital markets, venture funds, commercial transactions and general corporate law.  He also has substantial experience as counsel to high tech, biotech and software companies in the development, protection and licensing of intellectual property.  His clients include start-up companies, family- and other closely-held businesses, middle market business, Fortune 500 companies, venture funds and institutional investors.  Mr. Huber earned his B.A. from the University of Colorado and his J.D. at the University of Colorado Law School.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 1/1/2023
    Avail. Until
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Franchise Agreements: What You Need to Know Before Your Clients Signs, Part 2

$75.00

  Franchises often seem to clients like vehicles to assured success, but they are risky ventures.  The task for lawyers advising clients about franchises is to counsel them about setting reasonable expectations and help them understand the practical obligation of franchise agreements.  This is no easy task because these agreements are a complex arrangement of restrictions, fees, operational requirements, intellectual property protections and reporting periods. But understanding how these agreements work – and the range of what’s negotiable and what’s not – is essential to client success.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to the framework of franchise law, practical due diligence of franchise opportunities, and reviewing and negotiating the most important provisions of franchise agreements.   Day 1: Setting and counseling clients about realistic franchise expectations Practical guide to reading/understanding a Franchise Disclosure Document (FDD) Phases of franchise review – due diligence, negotiation of agreement, and lease work Spotting red flags early in the process Framework of franchise law and relationship of federal/FTC regulations to state regulation   Day 2: Major economic and non-economic provisions in franchise agreements Determining what’s truly negotiable – and what’s not Scope of territory – rights within in it and the opportunity to expand Tiers of fees, royalties and marketing expenses Operating standards and covenants – and negotiating for local modification Transfer and exit issues when a franchisee wants out   Speaker: H. Michael Drumm is the founder and member of Drumm Law, LLC in Denver, Colorado, where he has an extensive franchise, trademark and business transactional practice.  He works with franchisors across industries nationwide helping them draft, file and renew their franchise Disclosure Documents and franchise agreements.  He has a specialty representing craft breweries to help them trademark their brands and protect their intellectual property. He has been repeatedly honored by Franchise Times magazine as a “Legal Eagle” and has been designated by the International Franchise Association as a “Certified Franchise Executive.”  Mr. Drumm received his BSBA from the University of Missouri-Columbia and his J.D. from the University of Texas School of Law.    

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 1/1/2023
    Avail. Until
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Franchise Agreements: What You Need to Know Before Your Clients Signs, Part 1

$75.00

Franchises often seem to clients like vehicles to assured success, but they are risky ventures.  The task for lawyers advising clients about franchises is to counsel them about setting reasonable expectations and help them understand the practical obligation of franchise agreements.  This is no easy task because these agreements are a complex arrangement of restrictions, fees, operational requirements, intellectual property protections and reporting periods. But understanding how these agreements work – and the range of what’s negotiable and what’s not – is essential to client success.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to the framework of franchise law, practical due diligence of franchise opportunities, and reviewing and negotiating the most important provisions of franchise agreements.   Day 1: Setting and counseling clients about realistic franchise expectations Practical guide to reading/understanding a Franchise Disclosure Document (FDD) Phases of franchise review – due diligence, negotiation of agreement, and lease work Spotting red flags early in the process Framework of franchise law and relationship of federal/FTC regulations to state regulation   Day 2: Major economic and non-economic provisions in franchise agreements Determining what’s truly negotiable – and what’s not Scope of territory – rights within in it and the opportunity to expand Tiers of fees, royalties and marketing expenses Operating standards and covenants – and negotiating for local modification Transfer and exit issues when a franchisee wants out   Speaker: David Gusewelle is an attorney in the Denver office of Drumm Law, LLC, where his practice focuses his practice on franchise and trademark law.  Prior to joining Drumm Law, he worked for law firms in the St. Louis, Missouri area, representing businesses and individuals in a variety of legal fields including litigation, real estate, bankruptcy and corporate law matters. Before entering private practice, he worked in real estate for an international petroleum company.  Mr. Gusewelle earned his B.S.B.A. from the University of Missouri-Columbia and his J.D. from Vanderbilt Law School.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 1/1/2023
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Exit Strategies: Selling Companies to Employees, Part 2

$75.00

Many closely held companies have only two potential sets of buyers – family members of the founding generation or managers and other employees of the enterprise. The market of third-party buyers for closely held companies can be very thin, so that when family members are not suitable buyers of a company, often the best solution is to sell to employees. But sales to employees are unlike sales to third-parties or family members, involving complex issues of how to finance the sale, transition management and control of the enterprise, retain key employees, and tax treatment. This program will provide you with a detailed discussion of the major issues of selling to employees, including valuation, how the sale price is financed, transition periods, retaining employees not in the buyout group, and tax treatment.   Day 1: Long-range planning of sales to employees – and benefits over selling to third parties or family members Negotiating with employees over sales price and valuation issues Transitions of management control, including retaining seller/founder for a period of time Practical governance issues when employees are identified as potential buyers   Day 2: Overview of alternative structures and the tradeoffs of each ESOPs – structural, practical and tax issues, including leveraged buyout options Use of company redemptions of founders to accomplish a transfer Crucial issues in drafting “earnouts” on sales to employees Seller financing options, including long-term notes and security interest in assets   Speaker: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 1/1/2023
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Exit Strategies: Selling Companies to Employees, Part 1

$75.00

  Many closely held companies have only two potential sets of buyers – family members of the founding generation or managers and other employees of the enterprise. The market of third-party buyers for closely held companies can be very thin, so that when family members are not suitable buyers of a company, often the best solution is to sell to employees. But sales to employees are unlike sales to third-parties or family members, involving complex issues of how to finance the sale, transition management and control of the enterprise, retain key employees, and tax treatment. This program will provide you with a detailed discussion of the major issues of selling to employees, including valuation, how the sale price is financed, transition periods, retaining employees not in the buyout group, and tax treatment.   Day 1 : Long-range planning of sales to employees – and benefits over selling to third parties or family members Negotiating with employees over sales price and valuation issues Transitions of management control, including retaining seller/founder for a period of time Practical governance issues when employees are identified as potential buyers   Day 2 : Overview of alternative structures and the tradeoffs of each ESOPs – structural, practical and tax issues, including leveraged buyout options Use of company redemptions of founders to accomplish a transfer Crucial issues in drafting “earnouts” on sales to employees Seller financing options, including long-term notes and security interest in assets   Speaker: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.    

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 1/1/2023
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Drafting Liquidated Damages Clauses

$75.00

Liquidated damages clauses are a risk allocation tool used across business, commercial, real estate and sometimes employment agreements.  On the occurrence of certain carefully defined triggering events, the breaching party is liable for the liquidated damages amount.  Triggering events run the gamut from failure to deliver marketable products on a timely basis to early termination of an employment contract. Though these clauses are intended reduce the risk of post-closing litigation over damages, the scope of damages is not always knowable at closing and poorly drafted clauses may cause more litigation. This program will provide you a real world guide to the essential elements of enforceable liquidated damages clauses.   Law governing liquidated damages clauses Elements of clauses – damages difficult to quantify and liquidated amount reasonably related to actual damages Guidance on optionality, specificity, self-justification, and triggers Circumstances in which clauses are most effectively used – and those where they are ineffective Practical tips of enhancing enforceability and collecting damages   Speaker: Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly & Walker, LLC, where has litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and office liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivate actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 1/1/2023
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Charging Orders in Business Transactions

$75.00

A charging order redirects a partner or LLC member’s distributions, if any, to a creditor.  These court orders are frequently used when an LLC or partnership interest has been pledged to a creditor as collateral and the debtor is in default. Charging orders differ substantially from liens on corporate stock because charging orders do not allow the creditor to foreclose on the LLC or partnership interest but only claim distributions from the entity.  The creditor does not succeed to any other rights of the LLC member – voting rights, management rights – and is totally dependent on the entity to make distributions.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to the uses and limitations of charging orders in transactions and tips on enhancing their effectiveness.    What does a creditor get with a charging order and what rights does the debtor retain? Impact of charging orders on the entity Enhancing the enforceability of charging orders Enforcement of one state’s charging order statute in another state Tax consequences of charging orders   Speakers: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law. Daniel Kleinberger is an Emeritus Professor of Law at Michell|Hamline where his teaching and scholarship focused on business law.  He has served as the reporter on many uniform laws in business law, including Series Unincorporated Entities and Limited Partnerships.  Before entering academic, he was an in-hose counsel at the 3m Corporation.  He is the author of a leading treatise on LLCs and a popular student treatise on agency, partnerships, and LLCs.  Professor Kleinberger earned his A.B. from Harvard University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/15/2021
    Presented
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Charging Orders in Business Transactions

$75.00

A charging order redirects a partner or LLC member’s distributions, if any, to a creditor.  These court orders are frequently used when an LLC or partnership interest has been pledged to a creditor as collateral and the debtor is in default. Charging orders differ substantially from liens on corporate stock because charging orders do not allow the creditor to foreclose on the LLC or partnership interest but only claim distributions from the entity.  The creditor does not succeed to any other rights of the LLC member – voting rights, management rights – and is totally dependent on the entity to make distributions.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to the uses and limitations of charging orders in transactions and tips on enhancing their effectiveness.    What does a creditor get with a charging order and what rights does the debtor retain? Impact of charging orders on the entity Enhancing the enforceability of charging orders Enforcement of one state’s charging order statute in another state Tax consequences of charging orders   Speakers: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law. Daniel Kleinberger is an Emeritus Professor of Law at Michell|Hamline where his teaching and scholarship focused on business law.  He has served as the reporter on many uniform laws in business law, including Series Unincorporated Entities and Limited Partnerships.  Before entering academic, he was an in-hose counsel at the 3m Corporation.  He is the author of a leading treatise on LLCs and a popular student treatise on agency, partnerships, and LLCs.  Professor Kleinberger earned his A.B. from Harvard University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.  

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/15/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Choice of Entity for Service Businesses

$75.00

Familiar tradeoffs in choice of entity for businesses selling goods are scrambled when it comes to service-based businesses. This is particularly true with regard to tax law and the relatively new deduction for certain types of income in pass-through businesses. Choice of entity for service businesses also differ in consideration of distributions and employment taxes, incentive compensation and vesting of restricted ownership interests, and the eventual sale, liquidation or accession of new owners.  This program will provide you with practical guide to choice of entity for service businesses with special emphasis on the new tax law.   How the new deductions for pass-through income applies to service businesses What income and types of businesses are covered or not Regulatory, industry, finance and other non-tax considerations for service businesses Using multiple entities to achieve variable ownership, management and tax goals Converting entities if a prior choice of entity is no longer sound   Speaker: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/23/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Choice of Entity for Service Businesses

$75.00

Familiar tradeoffs in choice of entity for businesses selling goods are scrambled when it comes to service-based businesses. This is particularly true with regard to tax law and the relatively new deduction for certain types of income in pass-through businesses. Choice of entity for service businesses also differ in consideration of distributions and employment taxes, incentive compensation and vesting of restricted ownership interests, and the eventual sale, liquidation or accession of new owners.  This program will provide you with practical guide to choice of entity for service businesses with special emphasis on the new tax law.   How the new deductions for pass-through income applies to service businesses What income and types of businesses are covered or not Regulatory, industry, finance and other non-tax considerations for service businesses Using multiple entities to achieve variable ownership, management and tax goals Converting entities if a prior choice of entity is no longer sound   Speaker: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/23/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Roadmap of Venture Capital and Angel Funding, Part 1

$75.00

Rapidly growing companies often raise capital in “angel” or venture capital transactions.  Investors provide capital in exchange for carefully structured equity rights and frequently some form of governance rights. Investors also often provide the company with industry expertise, contacts, and access that may be as valuable as financial capital. These funding transactions can take a startup or more mature company to higher levels of growth. But they are complex transactions that can involve a dozen or more interrelated documents. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the stages and documentation of an angel or venture capital transaction. Day 1: Current state of angel and venture capital markets & trends in deal terms Review of the suite of documents involved in most funding deals Methods of valuation and their impact on successive stages of investment Reviewing or drafting terms sheets – pitfalls and opportunities Angel investing – equity v. debt, common terms, impact on later venture capital funding   Day 2: Review of most highly negotiated terms in funding deals Investor protections – information  & veto rights, liquidity event rights Liquidation preferences, anti-dilution rights, and dividends Striking the right balance between founders/managers and investors on the board Options pools for founders, managers and employees   Speaker: Howard Bobrow is a partner in the Cleveland, Ohio office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he chairs the firm’s venture capital practice. He counsels private equity and venture capital firms, other institutional investors and angel investors on all aspects of acquisitions, dispositions, capital formation and private placements. He regularly represents and advises funds on their organization and formation, the fundraising process, governance matters, investments and compliance with pertinent regulations.  Mr. Bobrow earned his B.S. from Miami University and his J.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Law.   Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/26/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Roadmap of Venture Capital and Angel Funding, Part 1

$75.00

Rapidly growing companies often raise capital in “angel” or venture capital transactions.  Investors provide capital in exchange for carefully structured equity rights and frequently some form of governance rights. Investors also often provide the company with industry expertise, contacts, and access that may be as valuable as financial capital. These funding transactions can take a startup or more mature company to higher levels of growth. But they are complex transactions that can involve a dozen or more interrelated documents. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the stages and documentation of an angel or venture capital transaction. Day 1: Current state of angel and venture capital markets & trends in deal terms Review of the suite of documents involved in most funding deals Methods of valuation and their impact on successive stages of investment Reviewing or drafting terms sheets – pitfalls and opportunities Angel investing – equity v. debt, common terms, impact on later venture capital funding   Day 2: Review of most highly negotiated terms in funding deals Investor protections – information  & veto rights, liquidity event rights Liquidation preferences, anti-dilution rights, and dividends Striking the right balance between founders/managers and investors on the board Options pools for founders, managers and employees   Speaker: Howard Bobrow is a partner in the Cleveland, Ohio office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he chairs the firm’s venture capital practice. He counsels private equity and venture capital firms, other institutional investors and angel investors on all aspects of acquisitions, dispositions, capital formation and private placements. He regularly represents and advises funds on their organization and formation, the fundraising process, governance matters, investments and compliance with pertinent regulations.  Mr. Bobrow earned his B.S. from Miami University and his J.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Law.   Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/26/2021
    Presented
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